What Is Domestic Violence

Domestic Violence

Domestic violence can be defined as a pattern of behavior in any relationship that is used to gain or
maintain power and control over an intimate partner, it can happen to anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion or gender. It can happen to couples who are married, living together or who are dating, it affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels.

The Types of Abuse Are:
Physical, Sexual, Emotional, Verbal, Financial, Economic

Physical

It can include punching, hitting, slapping, kicking, strangling, or physically restraining a partner against their will.

Sexual

This type abuse can involve rape or other forced sexual acts, or withholding or using sex as a weapon.

Emotional/Verbal

Putting her/him down, making her/him feel bad about themselves, calling her/him names, making her/him think their crazy.

Financial/Economic

Preventing her/him from getting or keeping a job, making her/him ask for money, giving her/him an allowance, taking her/his money.

Personal Safety Plan

A safety plan is an outline that includes ways to remain safe while in a relationship, planning to leave, or after you leave.

Creating a personalized safety plan encompasses how to cope with emotions, telling friends and family about the abuse, and the steps to be taken in the event of legal action.

In a duffle bag, place two days change of clothes for yourself and children. Place all needed medications, important documentations and insurance cards in the bag. Then hide the bag within the home where the aggressor can’t find it.

Consider these questions when developing your own safety plan:

  • Are you able to confide in a trusted source — a friend, family member, or neighbor?

  • Is it possible to avoid areas or locations that make you feel unsafe?

  • Where in your neighborhood could you go during an emergency?

  • Is there a list of phone numbers you need to memorize in the event of a crisis?

  • Do you have children to include in your safety plan?

  • Do your children know where to go in case they witness violence?

  • Do you need to have a safety plan in place for work or school?

  • Is your safety plan stored on a computer or smartphone?